Posted in Inspiration, Stories

The man who went to Paradise for purifying his heart

47031151_2206578906327610_5137587470448375015_nAnas ibn Malik radiyallahuanhu reported: We were sitting with the Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, and he said, “Coming upon you now is a man from the people of Paradise.” A man from the Ansar came whose beard was disheveled by the water of ablution and he was carrying both of his shoes with his left hand. The next day the Prophet ﷺ repeated the same words, and the man came in the same condition. The third day the Prophet ﷺ repeated the same again, and the man came in the same condition. When the Prophet ﷺ stood up to leave, Abdullah ibn Amr radiyallahuanhu followed the man and he said, “I am in a dispute with my father and I have sworn not to enter my home for three days. May I stay with you?” The man said yes.

Abdullah stayed three nights with the man but he never saw him praying at night. Whenever he went to bed, he would remember Allah and rest until he woke up for morning prayer. Abdullah said that he never heard anything but good words from his mouth. When three nights had passed and he did not see anything special about his actions, Abdullah asked him, “O servant of Allah, I have not been in dispute with my father nor have I cut relations with him. I heard the Prophet ﷺ say three times that a man from the people of Paradise was coming to us and then you came. I thought I should stay with you to see what you are doing that I should follow, but I did not see you do anything special. Why did the Prophet ﷺ speak highly of you?” The man said, “I am as you have seen.” When Abdullah was about to leave, the man said, “I am as you have seen, except that I do not find dishonesty in my soul towards the Muslims and I do not envy anyone because of the good that Allah has given them.” Abdullah said, “This is what you have achieved and it is something we have not accomplished.”

Source: Musnad Aḥmad 12286

Source: Sahih (authentic) according to Ibn Kathir

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Posted in Dhikr, Duaa, Inspiration, Quraan, Salaah, Uncategorized

10 Ways of Developing Love for Allah – Imam Ibn Ul Qayyim al Jawziyyah (rahimahullah)

IMG_20180813_054019From Madarij-us-Saalikeen (The State of Repentance)

Shaykh says: the reasons which cause mahabbah (love) of Allaah to develop, are ten:

First: Reciting the Qur’an, reflecting and understanding its meaning and its intent.

Second: Drawing closer to Allaah, the Most High, through optional deeds, after fulfilling the obligatory duties.

Third: Being continuous in the dhikr (remembrance) of Allaah, with the tongue, the heart and the limbs under all circumstances. The more continuant the dhikr, the more muhabbah develops and intensifies.

Fourth: Giving precedence to what Allaah loves over personal loves, when being overcome by desires.

Fifth: Contemplating and deliberating over the Names and Attributes of Allaah.

Sixth: Recognising and remembering the favours and bounties of Allaah both manifest and hidden.

Seventh: To be humble and submissive before Allaah and this is the greatest matter.

Eighth: To be in seclusion reciting the Qur’an, during that time in which Allaah descends to the lowest heaven (which is the last third of every night), finishing this recitation with seeking Allah’s forgiveness and repenting to Him.

Ninth: To sit in the gatherings of the true and sincere lovers of Allaah, reaping the fruits of their speech, and not to speak except if there is benefit in it and that you know that such talk will increase you in goodness and that it will benefit others as well.

Tenth: To stay clear of all those causes which distances the heart from Allaah the Mighty and Majestic.

Posted in Build Yourself, Dhikr, Inspiration, Naqshband, Uncategorized

11 Principles of the Naqshbandi Way

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1. Hush dar dam (or hosh dar dam) — awareness of breathing

Being aware or conscious of one’s breathing. Breathing deeply in a natural rhythm without being preoccupied by breathing. Inhaling and exhaling whilst in remembrance of Allah.

2. Nazar ba kadam (or nazar bar qadam) — watching over the steps

Watching over one’s steps, ie being aware of one’s intention. Paying attention and not being distracted from one’s goal, maintaining awareness and being open to opportunities, so that one does the right thing at the right time.

3. Safar dar watan — travelling in the Homeland

Making an interior journey, ie inside oneself, observing oneself in a detached and not overly-critical manner, learning from one’s errors and travelling from blameworthy to praiseworthy qualities.

4. Khilwat dar anjuman (or khalwat dar anjuman) — retirement in company

Developing the ability to detach from and distance oneself from external noise, disturbance and confusion when in company, and remain tranquil, perhaps with the aid of a zikr, an exercise in remembrance of Allah. Also being able to re-attach one’s attention to the outward when necessary. Though outwardly the Sufi is in the world, inwardly he or she is with Allah.

5. Yad kardan (or yad kard) — remembering, recollecting exercises

Remembering experiences one has had and that one is a part of the Tradition from which one may draw positive energy and derive strength. Using inner or vocalized zikr, remembrance or “making mention” of the Divine names, to remain attentive and alert, and so that the heart becomes aware of the presence of Truth (Al Haqq).

6. Baaz gasht (or baz gasht) — restraint

Being self-disciplined, for example cultivating the quality of patience, keeping one’s thoughts from straying when repeating the Shahada (the declaration of the Oneness of Allah and the acceptance of Muhammad PBUH as his prophet), being repentant and returning to righteousness.

7. Neegar dashtan (or nigah dasht) — watchfulness, use of special faculties

Concentrating on the presence of Allah. Being alert, watchful for and open to subtle perceptions, positive energy, positive opportunity and positive impacts. Being watchful over passing thoughts.

8. Yad dashtan (or yad dasht) — keeping of the memory, sensing of the being and the body

Sensing one’s being and one’s body, recalling positive memories and positive experiences.

9. Ukufi zamani (or wuquf-e zamani) — time-halt (or pause)

Suspending intellect, judgement, preconceptions and conditioned thought. Reprising one’s thoughts and actions. Accounting for how one’s time is spent, being thankful for acts of righteousness and asking forgiveness for wrongdoing.

10. Ukufi adadi (or wuquf-e adadi) — number-halt (or pause)

Carrying out exercises involving numbers, such as the awareness of the number of repetitions when carrying out one’s silent heart zikr exercise, and also certain forms of counting using the Abjad[9] system.

11. Ukufi qalbi (or wuquf-e qalbi) — heart-halt (or pause) or visualisation

Visualising one’s heart (Qalb), with the name of Allah inscribed on it, and identifying with Truth or with Allah.