Posted in Dhikr, Duaa, Inspiration, Quraan, Salaah, Uncategorized

10 Ways of Developing Love for Allah – Imam Ibn Ul Qayyim al Jawziyyah (rahimahullah)

IMG_20180813_054019From Madarij-us-Saalikeen (The State of Repentance)

Shaykh says: the reasons which cause mahabbah (love) of Allaah to develop, are ten:

First: Reciting the Qur’an, reflecting and understanding its meaning and its intent.

Second: Drawing closer to Allaah, the Most High, through optional deeds, after fulfilling the obligatory duties.

Third: Being continuous in the dhikr (remembrance) of Allaah, with the tongue, the heart and the limbs under all circumstances. The more continuant the dhikr, the more muhabbah develops and intensifies.

Fourth: Giving precedence to what Allaah loves over personal loves, when being overcome by desires.

Fifth: Contemplating and deliberating over the Names and Attributes of Allaah.

Sixth: Recognising and remembering the favours and bounties of Allaah both manifest and hidden.

Seventh: To be humble and submissive before Allaah and this is the greatest matter.

Eighth: To be in seclusion reciting the Qur’an, during that time in which Allaah descends to the lowest heaven (which is the last third of every night), finishing this recitation with seeking Allah’s forgiveness and repenting to Him.

Ninth: To sit in the gatherings of the true and sincere lovers of Allaah, reaping the fruits of their speech, and not to speak except if there is benefit in it and that you know that such talk will increase you in goodness and that it will benefit others as well.

Tenth: To stay clear of all those causes which distances the heart from Allaah the Mighty and Majestic.

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Posted in Build Yourself, Dhikr, Inspiration, Naqshband, Uncategorized

11 Principles of the Naqshbandi Way

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1. Hush dar dam (or hosh dar dam) — awareness of breathing

Being aware or conscious of one’s breathing. Breathing deeply in a natural rhythm without being preoccupied by breathing. Inhaling and exhaling whilst in remembrance of Allah.

2. Nazar ba kadam (or nazar bar qadam) — watching over the steps

Watching over one’s steps, ie being aware of one’s intention. Paying attention and not being distracted from one’s goal, maintaining awareness and being open to opportunities, so that one does the right thing at the right time.

3. Safar dar watan — travelling in the Homeland

Making an interior journey, ie inside oneself, observing oneself in a detached and not overly-critical manner, learning from one’s errors and travelling from blameworthy to praiseworthy qualities.

4. Khilwat dar anjuman (or khalwat dar anjuman) — retirement in company

Developing the ability to detach from and distance oneself from external noise, disturbance and confusion when in company, and remain tranquil, perhaps with the aid of a zikr, an exercise in remembrance of Allah. Also being able to re-attach one’s attention to the outward when necessary. Though outwardly the Sufi is in the world, inwardly he or she is with Allah.

5. Yad kardan (or yad kard) — remembering, recollecting exercises

Remembering experiences one has had and that one is a part of the Tradition from which one may draw positive energy and derive strength. Using inner or vocalized zikr, remembrance or “making mention” of the Divine names, to remain attentive and alert, and so that the heart becomes aware of the presence of Truth (Al Haqq).

6. Baaz gasht (or baz gasht) — restraint

Being self-disciplined, for example cultivating the quality of patience, keeping one’s thoughts from straying when repeating the Shahada (the declaration of the Oneness of Allah and the acceptance of Muhammad PBUH as his prophet), being repentant and returning to righteousness.

7. Neegar dashtan (or nigah dasht) — watchfulness, use of special faculties

Concentrating on the presence of Allah. Being alert, watchful for and open to subtle perceptions, positive energy, positive opportunity and positive impacts. Being watchful over passing thoughts.

8. Yad dashtan (or yad dasht) — keeping of the memory, sensing of the being and the body

Sensing one’s being and one’s body, recalling positive memories and positive experiences.

9. Ukufi zamani (or wuquf-e zamani) — time-halt (or pause)

Suspending intellect, judgement, preconceptions and conditioned thought. Reprising one’s thoughts and actions. Accounting for how one’s time is spent, being thankful for acts of righteousness and asking forgiveness for wrongdoing.

10. Ukufi adadi (or wuquf-e adadi) — number-halt (or pause)

Carrying out exercises involving numbers, such as the awareness of the number of repetitions when carrying out one’s silent heart zikr exercise, and also certain forms of counting using the Abjad[9] system.

11. Ukufi qalbi (or wuquf-e qalbi) — heart-halt (or pause) or visualisation

Visualising one’s heart (Qalb), with the name of Allah inscribed on it, and identifying with Truth or with Allah.

Posted in Build Yourself, Dhikr, Inspiration, Uncategorized

Lessons a believer can learn from a tree

amazing-animal-beautiful-beautifull.jpgFrom a lecture of Shaykh Husain Abdul Sattar (hafizahullah)

Almighty Allah says in Surah 3, Aal-Imraan Verse 191, “Those who remember Allah while standing or sitting or [lying] on their sides and give thought to the creation of the heavens and the earth, [saying], “Our Lord, You did not create this aimlessly; exalted are You [above such a thing]; then protect us from the punishment of the Fire.”

When you spend time with those who do dhikr of Allah you notice the way they see the whole world as a reminder and manifestation of Allah Ta’ala and His Deen. The world and the entire creation becomes a Tasbeeh through which you remember Allah. Once Shaykh Zulfiqar (hafizahullah) mentioned about the signs of Allah and the Deen that a believer can take from a tree. There were many but I have recorded a few.

pexels-photo-302804.jpeg1. The tree takes from the ground and it gives to other people

A believer must take from what they have available and the primary focus must be to give and serve others.

pexels-photo-884547.jpeg2. Half of the tree is hidden and half is visible

The reality of the believer must remain hidden. A part of outward worship has to be seen by people, but the deeds of the believer must be secret between him and his Lord.

pexels-photo-762679.jpeg3. Much before the tree becomes visible, it first establishes its roots

As believers we must recognise that we must spend a lot of time establishing deep roots before we become visible and take a role of leadership in the community. People nowadays have no roots and have not taken time to establish them but want to be tall trees. If we truly desire to benefit people in Deen we have to first take the effort to develop very very deep roots.

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4. The tree stands totally still despite the varying seasons and conditions

Despite the winter and the summer, the cold and heat, the thunderstorms and rain, the tree stands firm. The same is the Imaan (faith) of a believer. Despite the turmoil and storms that afflict the believer he must be absolutely firm on faith.

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 5. The value of a tree is based on the fruit it produces

Similarly the value of a believer is based on the deeds he produces. If the believer is barren of good deeds like a barren tree no one will give him a second look.

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6. When people want the fruit from the tree they use sticks to get it

The believer will have to accept beating / hardship from some sticks in order for others to benefit from his goodness. Being a person of deen you must be prepared take a lot of knocks and this helps people to benefit from you and helps you get closer to Allah Ta’ala.

May Allah Ta’lala make us from those who ponder over His signs and from those who remember him while standing, sitting and laying down.